PowerShell Splatting: Overview

Have you ever been writing a PowerShell script, and looked at how wordy and long the command becomes? If so, you’ll want to familiarize yourself with the concept of PowerShell Splatting. This technique allows you to declare your PowerShell cmdlet parameters in a HashTable (aka. dictionary or key-value pairs), and then “splat” those parameters onto … Read morePowerShell Splatting: Overview

Microsoft Visual Studio as a Python IDE

If you’re running the Windows operating system, and doing any type of software development work in VB.NET, C#, PowerShell, MVC, JavaScript, or anything else, you’re most likely familiar with the Visual Studio Integrated Development Environment (IDE). Visual Studio has been known for a long time, as an enterprise-class, reliable, and most importantly extensible software development … Read moreMicrosoft Visual Studio as a Python IDE

Compress & Extract ZIP Archives with PowerShell

Introduction PowerShell 5.0 includes a module called Microsoft.PowerShell.Archive, which enables you to compress and extract ZIP files from the command line, or inside your PowerShell scripts. If we use the core PowerShell Get-Command, we can dynamically discover the commands that are available inside this module. You should already be familiar with the Get-Command command if … Read moreCompress & Extract ZIP Archives with PowerShell

Writing Interactive Scripts with PowerShell

If you’re authoring PowerShell scripts that are intended to be interactive, there are a couple of very easy ways to ask your users for input. Typically, user input falls into a couple categories: free-form text input, or a list of pre-defined values. We also might need to prompt the user to type in a secure … Read moreWriting Interactive Scripts with PowerShell

Working with CSV Files in PowerShell

If you’re working with data from PowerShell, you have most likely come across the CSV (Comma Separate Values) format. These files are very easy to work with in PowerShell, thanks to the CSV cmdlets. If this is your first time working with CSV files, it’s easy to discover the CSV-related commands in PowerShell. Create Some … Read moreWorking with CSV Files in PowerShell

Still using PowerGUI? Get on the Visual Studio train!

Are you still using the old Quest / Dell PowerGUI tool to author your PowerShell scripts and modules? If so, you may want to consider getting off the PowerGUI train, and hopping onto the Visual Studio 2015 or PowerShell Integrated Scripting Editor (ISE) train! By doing so, you will improve your PowerShell script & module … Read moreStill using PowerGUI? Get on the Visual Studio train!

PowerShell ISE: Jump to Column Feature

If you’re a developer, or even just a frequent user of a text editor, you’re probably familiar with the “Jump to Line” feature of most text editing software. The Microsoft Windows PowerShell Integrated Scripting Editor (ISE) offers such a feature, which is commonly mapped to the CTRL + G keyboard shortcut. One of the features … Read morePowerShell ISE: Jump to Column Feature

PowerShell: Resizing Azure Virtual Machines

Background Did you know that you can scale virtual machines in Microsoft Azure? If you’ve been working with the cloud, you’ve most likely heard about that capability before, but did you know that you can automate this function using PowerShell? It’s true! You can streamline many different operations in Microsoft Azure, using the Azure PowerShell … Read morePowerShell: Resizing Azure Virtual Machines

Secunia Webinar Follow-up

Thanks to everyone who attended my recent webcast with Secunia’s “We Speak Geek” series! The topic of discussion was deploying a lab for System Center Configuration Manager in Microsoft Azure, and automating the majority of the process in PowerShell. Want to deploy a #ConfigMgr lab in #Microsoft #Azure using #PowerShell? @Secunia webcast starts in 1 … Read moreSecunia Webinar Follow-up

Implementing a .NET Class in PowerShell v5

Introduction

You might have heard that PowerShell version 5.0 has introduced support for building .NET classes. Indeed, this is a powerful, new capability that has not previously existed in native PowerShell syntax. Before the new class-building syntax existed, if you wanted to build custom objects in PowerShell, you generally would either: 1) use the [PSCustomObject] type, or 2) build a .NET class in C#, and use the Add-Type command to import it into the PowerShell session.

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