Secunia Webinar Follow-up

Thanks to everyone who attended my recent webcast with Secunia’s “We Speak Geek” series! The topic of discussion was deploying a lab for System Center Configuration Manager in Microsoft Azure, and automating the majority of the process in PowerShell. Want to deploy a #ConfigMgr lab in #Microsoft #Azure using #PowerShell? @Secunia webcast starts in 1 … Read moreSecunia Webinar Follow-up

Implementing a .NET Class in PowerShell v5

Introduction

You might have heard that PowerShell version 5.0 has introduced support for building .NET classes. Indeed, this is a powerful, new capability that has not previously existed in native PowerShell syntax. Before the new class-building syntax existed, if you wanted to build custom objects in PowerShell, you generally would either: 1) use the [PSCustomObject] type, or 2) build a .NET class in C#, and use the Add-Type command to import it into the PowerShell session.

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Use PowerShell DSC to Install DSC Resources

IMPORTANT: This post was authored in August 2014, and is out of date. At this point, you should be installing PowerShell DSC resources from the PowerShell Gallery, using the PowerShellGet\Install-Module command.

Introduction

A lot of the functionality provided by Microsoft PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) comes, not from the core product, but from the DSC Resources that are provided by Microsoft and the community. When you spin up a new Windows operating system, whether a physical machine, local virtual machine, or a Microsoft Azure virtual machine, you start out with a pretty barebones set of DSC resources. Those resources are listed here:

  • File
  • Archive
  • Environment
  • Group
  • Log
  • Package
  • Registry
  • Script
  • Service
  • User
  • WindowsFeature
  • WindowsProcess

Unfortunately, most people are going to need more capabilities than what is offered out of the box. To that end, Microsoft has been regularly providing “waves” of DSC resources to manage a variety of different applications. As of this article’s writing, the latest wave of DSC resources from Microsoft was “DSC Wave 6,” published on August 21, 2014. During the remainder of this article, our goal is to make sure that these additional DSC Resources are installed on our systems, in an automated fashion!

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PowerShell: Add Users to Active Directory Group from Text File

A customer recently requested a PowerShell script, to add Active Directory users to a security group. The list of users would come from a text file that resides on the filesystem. To that end, I wrote a short PowerShell script that does just that, complete with parameter validation. #requires -version 4.0 #requires -Module ActiveDirectory param … Read morePowerShell: Add Users to Active Directory Group from Text File

ConfigMgr: A Couple of Client Tweaks via PowerShell

Disable WINS Lookup via PowerShell & WMI If you’re running Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager, you probably don’t need to be using the WINS lookup for Server Locator Points. Normally, you’d have to de-install the ConfigMgr client, and then re-install it with the SMSDIRECTORYLOOKUP=NOWINS MSI property. If you don’t want to do that, and want … Read moreConfigMgr: A Couple of Client Tweaks via PowerShell

PowerShell: A first-timer’s perspective of PowerCLI

This blog post is a description of my first experience playing around with PowerCLI, which is VMware’s PowerShell module for managing vSphere servers. I haven’t really dealt with VMware much in my past, other than VMware Workstation, so I thought it was exciting to get the chance to play around with PowerShell & VMware together!

I won’t bore you with the installation details, and I’ll get right to firing it up. There’s a shortcut to launch PowerCLI in the Start Menu, and it’s got a custom icon on it, which makes it easily recognizable on the Windows Taskbar.

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PowerShell: Update-Help via Scheduled Task in Group Policy Preferences

Introduction

If you’re like me, you probably like to ensure that all your computers have PowerShell updatable help updated on a regular basis. You can achieve this using a variety of methods, but since Group Policy Preferences are available out of the box using Windows 7 and later, I figured it would be the perfect tool to keep PowerShell help up-to-date! The following guide will show you how to implement a Windows Scheduled Task to update PowerShell version 3.0 help on a regular basis.

The following operating systems include Group Policy Preferences Client Side Extensions (GPP-CSE) out of the box:

  • Windows 7
  • Windows 8
  • Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Windows Server 2012

You can also deploy the Windows Management Framework Core 3.0, and Group Policy Preferences Client Side Extensions to Windows Server 2008 non-R2 systems, however the equivalent client operating system, Windows Vista, does not support WMF 3.0.

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PowerShell Twitter Update [2013-02-24]

So it’s getting close the end of February, and it’s been several months since I’ve blogged anything new! For today’s post, let’s take a look at what’s going on, on Twitter in the PowerShell universe! #ConEmu @tphakala says that he’s discovered a project called #ConEmu. #ConEmu is a project hosted on Google Code and offers … Read morePowerShell Twitter Update [2013-02-24]

PowerShell: Generating functions with dynamic parameter auto-completion values

Download the GetDevice PowerShell Module  There is a PDF copy of this entire blog post inside of the attached zip file. It’s much more readable. Introduction The purpose of this document is to describe the goal and solution for creating dynamically-injected parameter auto-completion values into PowerShell function definitions. This is simply a proof of concept, … Read morePowerShell: Generating functions with dynamic parameter auto-completion values

PowerShell: Measuring Download Speeds

Have you ever downloaded a file from the Internet? Probably.

Have you ever downloaded a file with PowerShell? Maybe.

Have you ever wondered how fast your download was going? Sure.

Have you ever wondered how to get that information when you’re downloading a file with PowerShell? Maybe, but you didn’t have a solution until now!

Our web browsers calculate download speeds for us, somehow. Specifically how, I have no clue, but what I do know is that we are more than capable of calculating download speeds using PowerShell.

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