Automating the Lync Client with PowerShell

You love PowerShell, right? And you love the Microsoft .NET Framework? Are you setting out to automate the Microsoft Office 2013 Lync Client with PowerShell? If you answered “yes” to the last three questions, then you’ve come to the right place! We’re going to take a look at how to get started automating the Lync 2013 client using PowerShell! Thanks to PowerShell’s direct support for Microsoft .NET Framework types, we can easily manage Lync Client functions from PowerShell, much in the way that C# developers can!

Download and Install the SDK

The first thing you need to do is go out to Microsoft’s download site and grab the Lync 2013 SDK. The installation process is fairly painless, so just click “Next” through it. By default, the installation path is: %ProgramFiles(x86)%\Microsoft Office\Office15\LyncSDK.

Figure: The root folder of the Lync 2013 SDK.
The root folder of the Lync 2013 SDK.

When you install the Microsoft Lync 2013 SDK, what you get is basically a series of Microsoft .NET assemblies (aka. .NET libraries) that allow you to perform automation functions on the Lync 2013 Client! Additionally, there is a CHM (compiled HTML help) file that contains some detailed documentation on how to utilize the SDK. If you’re interested in developing, get used to reading documentation!

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Forcibly installing the Android USB driver in Windows 7

If you are an Android mobile device user, with a tablet or phone, you may at some point desire to connect it to your Windows 7 computer over USB. Generally we do this so that we can use the debug interface with software utilities such as ADB.exe (Android Debug Bridge), which is included with the Google Android SDK.

Upon first connecting your Android device to your Windows 7 system, you might realize that there is no device driver available out-of-the-box to allow the debug interface to work properly. When you open Device Manager (devmgmt.msc) or Computer Management (compmgmt.msc) – which contains the Device Manager MMC snap-in – you might notice a generic icon representing an “Android Device” under the “Other Devices” category. Basically, this means that Windows 7 recognizes the presence of the device, but doesn’t know how to “talk” to it. To get Windows to talk to our Android device, we must install the Google USB driver.

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PowerShell: Disable ConfigMgr Task Sequence Countdown Notification

Introduction If you are using Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM / ConfigMgr) to deploy task sequences to ConfigMgr client systems, you may notice that by default, a countdown notification is shown as a balloon notification in the client’s system tray. In some cases, this functionality may be undesirable, and you may therefore wish to … Read morePowerShell: Disable ConfigMgr Task Sequence Countdown Notification

PowerShell: Update your ConfigMgr OSD Boot Images to WinPE 3.1

When you upgrade your boot images in Microsoft’s System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM / ConfigMgr) 2007 from WinPE 3.0 to WinPE 3.1, you must run the ExportDefaultBootImage() WMI method on the SMS_BootImagePackage WMI class for each boot image architecture. Typically this would simply include x86 (32-bit) and x64 (64-bit) boot images (Windows Image Format (WIM) … Read morePowerShell: Update your ConfigMgr OSD Boot Images to WinPE 3.1