PowerShell: Prompt Function to Monitor Memory Usage

Have you ever wanted to monitor your memory utilization in a PowerShell instance, but may not want to continually issue commands to determine it? Introducing …… the PowerShell Prompt to monitor memory utilization!! function prompt { "$(‘{0:n2}’ -f ([double](Get-Process -Id $pid).WorkingSet/1MB)) MB> " } Here’s the result:

PowerShell: Finding Friday the 13th

Update (2012-01-13): Justin Dearing (aka @zippy1981) informed me that it would be more efficient to look at the 13th of each month, and test if it was a Friday. In theory at least, he’s absolutely correct; I wrote the function the first way I thought of it, and I always welcome suggested improvements. This morning … Read more PowerShell: Finding Friday the 13th

PowerShell: Move ConfigMgr Collections

Introduction If you work with Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM / ConfigMgr) 2007 in any capacity, you probably are familiar with the concept of "collections" and how painful they can be to work with sometimes. The ConfigMgr console does not provide any method of moving a collection from one parent to another, and the … Read more PowerShell: Move ConfigMgr Collections

PowerShell: Report / Check the Size of ConfigMgr Task Sequences

Introduction

In Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager 2007 operating system deployment (OSD), there is a limitation of 4MB for task sequence XML data. This is discussed in a couple of locations:

The Technet document linked to above says the following:

Extremely large task sequences can exceed the 4-MB limit for the task sequence file size. If this limit is exceeded, an error is generated.

Solution: To check the task sequence file size, export the task sequence to a known location and check the size of the resulting .xml file.

Basically, the Technet troubleshooting article is suggesting that you would need to go into the ConfigMgr console, right-click a task sequence, export it to a XML file, and then pull up the file properties. That’s fine for one-off troubleshooting, but what if you had 1000 task sequences and needed to know how large all of them were? Read on to find out how!

Read morePowerShell: Report / Check the Size of ConfigMgr Task Sequences

PowerShell: Override GPO and Detect Windows Updates

Introduction

If you’re using a workstation in an enterprise environment, there may be Active Directory Group Policy Object (GPO) settings forcing a certain behavior of the Microsoft Windows Update Agent (aka. Automatic Update Agent). You might be a power user who wants to actually ensure that their workstation is fully patched before the IT department releases patches according to their standard cycle. One option would be to ask your IT department to include you in the pilot group for software updates, but failing that option, you can temporarily override the GPO settings and force an updates detection.

Read morePowerShell: Override GPO and Detect Windows Updates

PowerShell: Get a List of Installed Software from ConfigMgr

Let’s say you’ve got Microsoft’s System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM / ConfigMgr) in your IT environment (and if you don’t, why on earth not!). If you’re on the desktop management team, you might occasionally get requests from someone on a network or security team, inquiring as to the installed software on a particular client, or group of clients.

Rather than diving straight into the ConfigMgr reports, as most people do, sometimes it’s just faster to load a data set into PowerShell and massage the data from there. Why PowerShell? Well, it provides very easy, real-time filtering and sorting capabilities, and if you need to make a modification to a temporary “report,” you don’t have to worry about modifying the Report object in the ConfigMgr provider, which is typically done through the ConfigMgr console.

Read morePowerShell: Get a List of Installed Software from ConfigMgr

ConfigMgr: Cleanup Software Updates Objects

Introduction

A common complaint I hear about Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM / ConfigMgr) 2007 is the ability to clean up expired and superseded software updates from the objects related to software updates. As software updates are marked as expired or are superseded by newer software updates, Microsoft marks the old updates accordingly. Once an update has been retired, it is desirable for ConfigMgr administrators to remove the updates from deployments and reporting objects. This cleanup effort saves disk space for deployment packages, and can reduce unnecessary information from showing up in reports.

Read moreConfigMgr: Cleanup Software Updates Objects

PowerShell: Disable ConfigMgr Task Sequence Countdown Notification

Introduction If you are using Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM / ConfigMgr) to deploy task sequences to ConfigMgr client systems, you may notice that by default, a countdown notification is shown as a balloon notification in the client’s system tray. In some cases, this functionality may be undesirable, and you may therefore wish to … Read more PowerShell: Disable ConfigMgr Task Sequence Countdown Notification

PowerShell / ConfigMgr: Count of Client Manufacturer / Models

Introduction If you’re an administrator of Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM / ConfigMgr) 2007, you might be interested in finding out what make / model of client & server systems you have, and how many of each unique value you have. Most people would probably simply pull up a ConfigMgr report, but did you … Read more PowerShell / ConfigMgr: Count of Client Manufacturer / Models

Extreme PowerShell / ConfigMgr: Extending Hardware Inventory

Introduction

In previous versions of Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (ConfigMgr / SCCM), a common task for administrators, engineers, and consultants, was to extend the hardware inventory configuration. These inventory extensions were written in Managed Object Format (MOF) and allowed the SCCM client agents to report back a wider array of information to the central site database for reporting purposes, collection building, and other management tasks. Making changes to the configuration could be a tedious task, as MOF is not very forgiving, and rather quite strict, in its syntax.

In Microsoft Systems Management Server 2003 (SMS 2003), each time a configuration change was made, it was necessary to deploy the updated MOF file to the SMS clients — this made ensuring hardware inventory consistency across all clients a challenging task. In SCCM, Microsoft included changes to these MOF files (SMS_DEF.mof and Configuration.mof) as part of the machine policy refresh task, which is a client-side polling mechanism for configuration changes.

In SCCM 2012 Beta 2, Microsoft is taking it a step further and has eliminated the SMS_DEF.mof altogether, left the configuration.mof behind by itself, and stuck the WMI inventory configuration in … WMI. What is WMI? WMI stands for Windows Management Instrumentation, a service built into the Windows Operating System since Windows XP (and Windows 2000 Service Pack 4, I think). It provides a standard method of exposing hardware and software level system information to applications, such as storage, processor, memory, running processes, installed software, and other application configuration data. SCCM is built on top of this technology, and often makes developing software and scripts around the product much easier than it otherwise might be.

For the remainder of this article, we’re going to look at specifically how to extend hardware inventory in SCCM 2012 programmatically using Windows PowerShell with the SCCM WMI provider.

Read moreExtreme PowerShell / ConfigMgr: Extending Hardware Inventory